My Fantasy Favorites

Welcome to February is Fantasy Month!

Hi there friends! Happy February! This is going to be a huge month packed with all sorts of goodness, including the cover reveal for This Cursed Flame next week!!! This month is also Fantasy Month, so to celebrate we are going to dive into fantasy books in wonderful ways.

And what better way to kick off Fantasy Month than to share some of my all-time, current favorite fantasy reads??? I’ll break this down into a few categories, but these are some of the fantasy books I have read and loved over the years. (And yes, Harry Potter is on the list, but today I want to highlight other books!)

High Fantasy

I’m really picky about this! I don’t really love the LoTR-type fantasy (that whole Medieval Europe sword and sorcery thing). But here are a few others I enjoyed!

The Way of Kings (The Stormlight Archives #1), by Brandon Sanderson

This book is the first I read of Sanderson’s… but it made me see why everyone considers him the master fantasy writer! It’s full of unique setting and world details and has an intriguing and unique storyline that never gets old! It’s a brick of a book, but I loved every second of it. And that magic system! *swoon*

Golden Daughter (Tales of Goldstone Wood #7), by Anne Elisabeth Stengl

THIS is how you do “inspired by” fiction! Stengl created an amazing world inspired by Asian culture, and it made for an incredible story and setting. And even though it’s #7 in the series, each can be read alone and out of order.

The Killing Moon (Dreamblood #1), by N.K. Jemisin

This is another example of unique worldbuilding and magic systems. The magic is based in dreams, and the culture has a very Egyptian feel to it. I loved getting to see such a unique world and meet characters with all kinds of struggles! One day I will read book #2…

Spice Bringer, by H.L. Burke

This is another awesome world with a very fun cast of characters. I loved the journey, and I loved the way the book made me think about life and faith and the things that really matter.

Urban Fantasy (Adult)

Okay, I LOVE urban fantasy! So here are some of my favorites. (Caution on some of these… they are written for an older audience, so if you are sensitive about content, look it up before reading!)

The Others series, by Anne Bishop

Oh. My. Word. This is such a twist on classic supernatural creatures, and the characters are so lovable, and the world is so intense… This may be my all-time favorite UF series!

Mercy Thompson series, by Patricia Briggs (also see Alpha and Omega series, which is a spinoff)

This is one of the best and most fun UF series out there. There are plenty of werewolves, vampires, shifters, and ghosts to go around! And Mercy is a blast of a main character to read. She’s fun and strong and intense!

October Daye series, by Seanan McGuire

Okay, McGuire has written some fantastic books, including ones under a pen name, and this series does not disappoint. Half-fae detective? Um, yes!

Split Feather, by Deborah A. Wolf

I. Loved. This. Book. And there need to be more of them ASAP. Let me just say BEAR SHIFTER WHO CAN GO INTO THE UNDERWORLD.

Weather Warden series, by Rachel Caine

While she may be better known for some of her vampire fiction, this series is about djinn and their relationship with gifted humans who can control elements such as earth, fire, and weather. It’s an amazing world that just gets better with every page.

YA (Young Adult) Fantasy

As a writer of YA fantasy, I love reading in this genre. And it is full of gems!

Children of Blood and Bone, by Tomi Adeyemi

That magic system, the mythology, the story… just wow!

The Elementals, by A.L. Knorr

Everything Knorr writes is amazing, and I especially love her elemental girls. Definitely a series not to miss!

Lost Voices series, by Sarah Porter

This is a mermaid trilogy, and it is definitely at the top of my mermaid fiction list. The mythology is great, the world is fantastic, and it is just dark enough and exciting enough to hold your attention until the last page. And each book just gets better!

Monsters of Verity series, by Victoria Schwab

This is such a great duology. It’s one of those stories that has a neat mythology and also makes you question real life. And her writing is some of the best out there!

Shadowshaper, by Daniel Jose Older

You want to talk magic systems? This is the one. Things the main character draws or paints can come to life… and follow her commands!

MG (Middle Grade) Fantasy

Oracles of Fire series, by Bryan Davis (companion series to the Dragons in our Midst series)

This is a Christian fantasy series I grew up with and loved. It makes you think, and it draws you into the characters and their world so completely.

Artemis Fowl series, by Eoin Colfer

You want a fun, lighthearted romp with tons of mythology? This is the series. I have loved these books since middle school, and I’m not putting them down any time soon!

Continue the Adventure!

You can check out the full schedule for February is Fantasy month here, and the next posts will be up according to the schedule. So jump in to the other blogs, hop onto Twitter for the hashtag game, and let’s have some fun!

Other Participating Blogs

There are a ton of bloggers participating in February is Fantasy Month. Here is a list (and hopefully I didn’t miss anyone!):

Guest Post: Kathryn McConaughy

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Hey folks! Today we get another peek into these amazing Snow White retellings with a fantastic guest post by the author of Overpowered, Kathryn McConaughy! Just a reminder in case you missed the last post, these are seven Snow White inspired retellings that are part of the Seven Magic Mirrors joint release. You can find more stops on the blog tour here, and be sure to look for information about the giveaway while you’re there!

Overpowered by Kathryn McConaughy

41575887Taliyah bat Shammai is fleeing a terrible crime. Though she has no hope of shelter, she must keep running—for the Avenger will be coming. Even losing herself in the mist-haunted hills cannot protect her for long. But perhaps other criminals can…

Yotam bin Yerubba’la has left his home, his only guide a cryptic dream. Endangered by a perilous secret, he soon finds himself among men with secrets of their own—in a place where trusting others may be his most serious mistake… or his best defense.

Cypress and his band have been mercenaries for a long time. Criminals all, they don’t trust easily and never reveal their hearts. But when a battle goes horribly wrong, each man must decide whether he fights for gold, for fame, or for something yet more rare…

Disguised as a boy, Taliyah finds the outlaw life to be full of more questions than answers. What are those strange tracks around the ruined houses? Why is Yotam so calm in the face of battle? Where are the rest of Cypress’ men? And who is the Avenger?
There may not be much time for Taliyah to find the answers, for war is about to ignite in the hills. And they all will burn…

Add it on Goodreads, or buy it on Amazon today!

Now, without further ado, Kathryn herself on the inspiration of this fantastic historical fantasy!

The Inspiration for Overpowered by Kathryn McConaughy

What inspired Overpowered?  A lot of different things.  I’m never short of inspiration, just short of time to write things down!

Obviously, Rooglewood’s Five Poisoned Apples contest was a big factor, because I had to write a Snow White story.  This was a challenge for me, as I’ve never been a huge fan of this particular fairy tale.  While Snow White is more sensible than many fairy tale heroines, managing to make a new home for herself with her work ethic and housekeeping skills, she is also very naïve, instantly trusting groups of men in the woods and mysterious old ladies. (Can I ask—how did Snow White learn to cook?  You don’t see many princesses in kitchens.) Then she rides off into the sunset with a man whose only credentials are that he can kiss a dead/sleeping woman and that a previous member of his bloodline achieved political power. I don’t think it’s the plot itself that I have a problem with—like Snow White, many people do live life reacting rather than acting—rather, it’s the fact that Snow White’s choices are presented so positively.  “Of course you should marry the handsome stranger.  And of course your friends the dwarves will be perfectly okay with this.”

Ayeh.  So it took me a while to wrap my head around writing a Snow White retelling.  I originally tried writing an SF version in which Snow flees the colony where she grew up after her stepmother tries to have her killed for her planetary corporation shares, but my SF Snow kept coming across as too passive.  So I moved back to my home court—the mythic ancient Near East—and started a version that was set there. I made Taliyah more active from the very beginning, a woman wary and brave, though still a bit too trusting.

The first scene I wrote was the one where Taliyah, my heroine, approaches the outlaw camp and meets my “dwarves.”  I love writing “band of brothers” characters—they play off each other so well. And, as you know if you read “Guardian of Our Beauty,” I find the Late Bronze Age hillmen endlessly fascinating.  I had been reading a lot of books and articles on the relationship between townsfolk and nomads in the ancient Near East, so that information also made its way into the story and into the character backgrounds.  Anyway, in this scene I was able to explore who Taliyah was and how she was going to relate to the other characters. I was amazed that she was able to get Thorn, the band’s paranoid lookout, to talk to her, but their first conversation was wonderful.  After that, I was really excited to be writing her story.

About half of the ideas that took root in Overpowered had been hanging out in my head waiting to be used long before I knew that I would be writing a Snow White retelling.  For example, I’m very interested in the ancient Near Eastern wisdom traditions, whether they be in the Bible or out of it. I think that we often don’t appreciate what a big part those wisdom traditions—whether in the form of proverbs, poems, or parables—played in the lives of the ancient people.  There was one character, a middle-aged man who only communicates in proverbs, who had been living in my head for quite some time. So when I saw an opportunity to drop him into this story (where he would have to stay instead of wandering around in my brain making trouble) I wrote him in. That’s where Willow came from.

Many of my favorite wisdom tales from the Bible use plant imagery.  My favorite of all is Jotham’s cautionary speech to the Shechemites in Judges 9.  Distressed by their support of his murderous brother, he tells them a story about trees.  The trees want to have a king, but all of the trees with good reputations turn down the job.  Finally, the trees ask the bramble to rule over them. The bramble agrees, but pronounces a terrible curse on them if they betray him.  (Basically, Jotham is trying to tell the Shechemites that making his brother king was a bad idea.) I’ve always been intrigued by this tree tale, so I amused myself by giving my “dwarves” tree names in keeping with their appearances and personalities.  The grumpy “dwarf” is named Thorn, the giant is named Cedar, and so on.

Then I thought, “Why not make the homage to Judges 9 more obvious by letting Jotham’s brother Abimelek run around in the background?”  So I put him in. In the Five Poisoned Apples version of the story, you never actually met him, you just got Easter Egg-like references to him and his campaigns through the hill country.

Then Jotham turned up and said, “I’ve just had to flee after giving that tree speech against my brother.  I think I’ll join this outlaw band.” Well. I couldn’t chase him away; he was so friendly and polite. So I thought that he could be a dwarf, and maybe no one would notice that he was a biblical figure.

Then Taliyah started noticing how brave and kind and godly he was.  Long story short, he ended up as the hero of the piece, and I went back and wrote a bunch of scenes from his perspective.

As you can see, Overpowered came together from a lot of different sources—but I think that it really did come together into one integrated story world, a story world that I loved writing about.  In fact, I got so attached to these characters that I’m working on a sequel! I’m very excited to share the story with you all. I hope you enjoy it.

Concluding Thoughts

I had the great opportunity to read this story, and I have to say it was such a refreshing taste of a culture we very rarely read in most fiction, and especially as a fantasy! If you have any interest in the Near East, or fantasy, definitely give this a try!

If any of this has piqued your interest, remember you can add it on Goodreads or buy it on Amazon!

Happy reading!

Author Interview: Sarah Pennington

MagicMirrorsGraphic.jpgIt’s that time again: another fantastic release! A while back, I had entered a Snow White retelling contest. More recently, I shared with you a couple of releases that came from that contest. And now, even more! So if you love retellings, Snow White, or anything in between, this is perfect! I had the great joy of being able to read some of these ahead of time, and I am absolutely blown away!

One of my favorites of this release is Sarah Pennington’s Blood in the Snow, an Asian-inspired retelling that combines Snow White and the Goose Girl. And seriously, this one has such beautiful language and storytelling… one of the best things I’ve read all year.

To help celebrate this release, I had a chance to talk to Sarah herself and give you an inside look at Blood in the Snow. Enjoy!

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Q: Tell us a little bit about your writing journey. When did you start writing? When did you decide you wanted to publish?

Well, I’ve been telling stories to myself and others for as long as I can remember, but I started writing semi-seriously when I was about eleven or twelve. Then I did my first NaNoWriMo event in November of 2011, and I’ve had at least one story in progress at all times since then.

As for publishing: for the longest time, I fully planned to pursue traditional publishing — I even wrote a blog post about why I wasn’t going to self-publish even though I knew so many people who were doing it. I started to question that decision last January — I can’t even tell you why I suddenly wasn’t sure about my plan, only that I went from feeling very certain that I wasn’t going to self-publish to wondering if self-publishing really was the better option. Then, in April of this year, the results of the Five Poisoned Apples came out, and . . . I didn’t win. But I did achieve Special Unicorn status (which means I got a perfect score from the judge), which meant I had a cover and a story that very easily could’ve made it into the collection. That was two of my self-publishing doubts down. And since Kendra [Ardnek] was running the Magic Mirrors release, that took care of another big concern, marketing. And so, here I am.

Q: Where do you often find inspiration?

Haha, a better question is where don’t I find inspiration? A lot of my ideas come from the music I listen to (which is a very eclectic mix, just saying) or from things in books that I wish the authors would’ve explored more. But I’ve also come up with ideas through random conversations with friends, or from road signs, or just from nowhere in particular.

Q: What are your favorite themes or topics to write about?

So, I typically don’t set out to write stories about particular themes, but there definitely are themes that come up frequently in my writing. One of these themes is the idea of power: types of power, the ways people deal with power, the ways power changes people, and the responsibility and opportunities that power brings. I especially enjoy the contrast between those who seek power and those who are given power without seeking it, which is definitely something that comes up in Blood in the Snow. At the start of the story, Baili has been given a certain type of power that she’s really not sure if she should have or not, and a significant part of the story is her deciding whether or not she’s going to claim the responsibility and opportunity that power gives her or if she’s going to let those things, along with that power, slip away.

Q: What inspired Blood in the Snow? What made you choose an Asian-inspired retelling?

I originally wrote Blood in the Snow for the Rooglewood Press Five Poisoned Apples contest. I wanted to explain the villain’s obsession with being the fairest, or at least for wanting Snow White dead. I tossed a few ideas around at first, including vampire!Snow White and variations on the term “fairest” before settling on the idea of the prophecy with the help of my sister. Then I added the setting because the description of Snow White — pale skin, dark hair, and red lips — fits very well with ideals of beauty in several East Asian countries, plus I thought that an Asian-inspired setting would help set Blood in the Snow apart from some other retellings.

Q: What were your favorite and least favorite parts to write?

My favorite part of writing Blood in the Snow was, without a shadow of a doubt, writing any scene with Chouko and Gan in it. These two are fun even when they’re not in the same room, but put them together and the dialogue practically writes itself. They both have very strong, distinct personalities — they’re polar opposites in some respects, but incredibly similar in others, and that means they play off each other very well.

My least favorite part of writing Blood in the Snow was actually editing the book. The original version of Blood in the Snow was about 30,000 words long, but since I wanted to submit it to the Rooglewood Press Five Poisoned Apples contest, I had to cut it down to 20,000 words. It was a struggle, let me tell you, but building it back up when I decided to self-publish was fun.

Q: Do you have any hints for other projects coming up?

Currently, I’m working on editing Mechanical Heart, a steampunk retelling of Rapunzel featuring a powerless prince and a girl trapped in a clock tower. My goal is to have it finished in time to submit for the next Arista Challenge release, Golden Braids. Aside from that, I’m taking a good look at the novels I’ve written already and the novels I intend to write in the near future and figuring out what needs [to be] written, rewritten, or edited first.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share with readers?

I’d just like to offer a little encouragement from both Baili’s life and mine: sometimes, what you thought was set in stone is more malleable than you think. Sometimes, a future you thought was decided turns out to be in flux. And that’s ok, because God’s plans don’t change, and He’s the one in control. So sometimes, when things aren’t turning out the way you expected them to, the best thing you can do is to let go of your plans and look for what new adventure you’ve been given. It’s not easy (it’s definitely something I still struggle with and will probably struggle with for most of my life), but it’s worth it.

Concluding Thoughts

Thanks so much, Sarah, for all your inside info and that awesome piece of encouragement at the end. I’ve definitely seen similar changes to my life plans, and I love how stories can help us see we’re not the only ones. Seriously amazing story, and I’m so glad to have had you on the blog today!

Now, for you readers, I hope you have found this as fun and interesting as I have! And if any of this has piqued your interest, be sure to head over and check out the rest of the tour and the other releases in the Magic Mirrors release! PS, there’s a giveaway by five of the authors for paperbacks of their books over at that link.

You can also buy Sarah’s book here.

Happy reading!

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Blog Tour: Paws, Claws, and Magic Tales

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It’s that time again! Time to showcase another new book! This time, it’s a fantasy anthology by the lovely authors over at Fellowship of Fantasy. Feel free to follow the link to see other stops on this blog tour.

If you’re an animal lover and a fantasy lover (like me), then this anthology will appeal to you. This book is packed with sixteen magic tales with cats taking the lead. I have a pre-order link and Goodreads, for your viewing pleasure.

What’s that? You want to know more? Well, how about a blurb for each of the stories in this volume?

The Witching Hour by Savannah Jezowski
As shadows encroach on the city of Lite, one cat stands between humanity and the hounds of darkness. Will true love save the day?

Tail of Two Kitlings by Sharon Hughson
Two kitlings. One tail. A mother’s sacrifice and a brother’s betrayal. Who will survive the Siamese curse?

Black Knight by Laura L. Laura Croman Zimmerman 
When a jingly bell goes missing, there’s only one supercat to solve this crime—the mysterious Black Knight.

Sulphur & Sunshine by Grace Bridges
How to Handle a Dragon, Feline Edition: on a volcanic shore, the accidental appearance of a local fire-guardian has unusual consequences for a street cat.

The Magic of Catnip by A. J. Aletha Bakke
An impulse purchase of catnip leads to unexpected shenanigans.

The Secret Treasons of the World by J. L. Rowan
When Braelin stumbles upon an outlawed Guardian, she must choose between his safety and her own—and the cost may be more than she can bear.

The Poor Miller and the Cat by Lelia Rose Foreman
When a poor miller rescues a cat, it promises to make him a wealthy man. But what is true wealth?

Alex the Cat and Alex the Prince by Ace G. Pilkington
The prince’s parents are telling him he has to marry for money, and his cat says it could cost him his life.

Whisker Width by H. L. Burke
Get a cat they said. It’ll be fun, they said. No one mentioned the portals to a mysterious realm opening up in Kara’s bathroom.

The Honorable Retrieval of Miss Sunbeam Honeydew by Pamela Sharp
When two princesses of the realm claim the same cat, how far will their loyal retainers go to see that each princess gets her way?

The Witch’s Cat by Rachel Ann Michael Rachel Harris
Walk under ladders. October the 13th. A black cat. Perhaps the only way to bring two lovers together is through the worst luck.

The Cat-Dragon and the Unicorn by Janeen Ippolito
Ademis the cat-dragon only wants his freedom but must graciously help a scared unicorn girl who should be glad of his benevolent assistance.

Destined for Greatness by Jenelle Leanne Leanne Schmidt
Kendall knows he is destined for great things. The problem is, the Fates — if they even exist — don’t seem to agree.

Sammy’s Secret by Karin De Havin
A ring is lost. A friendship is ruined. A cadre of cats is on the case!

Death Always Collects by Jeremy Rodden
Loki, a regular old Siamese cat, finds Death looming to take his human. Bargain as much as you want, but remember: Death always collects.

The Wild Hunt by Naomi P. Cohen
When an immigrant violinist’s music enchants a Cait Sidhe, she’s entangled in the secret world of the New York Fae.

Interested yet? What about a Rafflecopter giveaway for a paperback of the book?

Okay, okay, I’m done! But seriously folks, these look amazing. One more time, here are the links: pre-order link and Goodreads. Note that there are two pre-order links, depending on your reading preferences.

Thanks for tuning in, and I’ll see you all tomorrow for our regularly scheduled post!

Book Spotlight: Child of Prophecy

Guys, I am really excited about this one. I’ve read the blurb (see below) and am dying for it to come out. It has all the fantasy and adventure my heart has been yearning to read lately! Take a look below, and see what you think!

Blog Tour Banner

About the Book

Child of Prophecy Front CoverOne misfit. One prophecy. Two worlds. Being different is bad until you find out it’s the only thing that might save you.

How far would you go to fit in? Another world?

Fifteen-year-old Nova Hawthorne has a unique trait that sets her apart, yet she wants nothing more than to be normal and fit in.

She soon finds out that there’s a very real reason why she feels so out of place in this world—she’s from another one. And prophecy says she is destined to destroy them both. Continue reading “Book Spotlight: Child of Prophecy”

Author Interview: Kendra E. Ardnek

Another exciting post today, folks! This week, author Kendra E. Ardnek is preparing to release her newest book, The Worth of a King. This is book one in a brand new high fantasy series, and we will be talking directly to Kendra today all about the book and her life as an author. (How gorgeous is this cover?!)

Kendra is also giving away a paperback copy of her book and a 15 mL bottle of peppermint oil (to US readers), and a special prize for whoever leaves the most comments across the blog tour (open internationally). Check out the rest of the tour here.

Here’s a little blurb to get you started:

32739875Princess Obsidia’s father was killed the night she was born. Since there was no male heir, the crown went to the man who killed him, by Dialcian law. This never bothered her, growing up, and when it comes time for Obsidia to choose her husband, she chooses Prince Delaney, the son of that man, with little hesitation. Only then does her life start crumbling around her.

Adrian expected to live a normal life, taking his father’s place at the print shop when his father retired. But, on his eighteenth birthday, when the princess’ engagement is announced, his world is ripped out from under him when he learns that his life was a ruse, and he is the twin brother to the princess – and expected to take back his father’s throne.

Delaney knows that his country is hovering on the brink of war – and that his father may harbor murderous intentions towards his intended bride due to her Zovordian blood. He wants nothing more than to protect Obsidia and his people, but as merely prince, he has little power against his father.

The ancient war between the Dragons and the Immortal King and Queen is nearing its climax, and the three are already caught in it.

You can add it to Goodreads here
or buy it here
or read the first chapter here!

And now, the main event: interview with Kendra E. Ardnek!

Kendra E. ArdnekKendra E. Ardnek loves fairytales and twisting them in new and exciting ways. She’s been or acting them on her dozen plus cousins and siblings for years. “Finish your story, Kendra,” is frequently heard at family gatherings. Her sole life goal has always been to grow up and be an author of fantasy and children’s tales that glorify God and His Word.
Find her online at: Website || Blog || Goodreads || Facebook || Twitter || Amazon 

Q: Tell us a little bit about your writing journey. When did you start writing? When did you decide you wanted to publish?

I’ve been writing ever since I understood that it was the proper thing to do with pencils – as opposed to having my pencils act the stories out. I think I always knew that I would someday have my name on the cover of a book, though I did distract myself with playwriting for the longest time. I just really wanted to be an actress. Still kinda do, but writing has supersceded it.

Q: Where do you find inspiration most often?

In the question “what if.” And also in the challenge to take cliche ideas and make them my own.

Q: What are your favorite themes to write about?

Trust, friendship, love, hope, acceptance, finding your purpose, and the meaning of womanhood.

Q: What inspired your upcoming release, The Worth of a King?

The desire to cowrite a book with Jack Lewis Baillot. See, she’d confessed that she struggled to write female characters, and at the time, I really struggled to write guys. So, we set out to write a book together where I had the female main character, and she the guy. We agreed that we didn’t want our characters to be romantic interests, and so twins were our natural choice, and we also both had a fascination with king stories. Unfortunately, she had to drop out of the project, but across the board, the book’s inspiration was “what is a story that we can write together?”

Q: What was your favorite part of writing the story? Least favorite?

My favorite part would be the delightful cast of characters we created. Least favorite would be the fact that Jack and I never quite found a rhythm when it came to writing it. (Which wasn’t why she dropped out, mind you, but I’m not sure that it wasn’t a factor.)

Q: Are there any hints for upcoming projects after this book releases?

How about this?

Q: What is your best piece of advice for someone who is either new to writing or new to publishing?

NETWORK. Build your platform and make connections with other writers and potential readers. No matter what route you go with for publication, having a ready audience can make or break you. I published my first book with no audience whatsoever, and it’s been nothing but a struggle to claw myself up since then. There is so much less pressure on you before you publish. Build your audience first.

Q: Do you have any other thoughts you’d like to share with my readers?

Um … I think I need more coffee…

Concluding Thoughts

Those are some really great answers! I also love the idea of “what if” (it inspired my WIP, Sea of Broken Glass), and I love those themes in stories. Thanks to Kendra for her answers, and lots of luck to her on this release! It sounds like an amazing read, and I hope it finds its audience without any hiccups. 🙂

That about wraps it up! To see other stops on this blog tour, hop on over to the main tour page here. And be sure to come back tomorrow for our regularly scheduled discussion!

Until then, happy writing and happy reading!

A Tale of Two Apples Blog Tour

Today I have something a little bit different (and a lot special) to share with you all. Remember how I entered that Snow White retelling contest a while back? Well, two of the other participants are publishing their stories for all to enjoy! Check out the spotlight below!

Book Spotlight

Annie Louise Twitchell and Rebekah DeVall are joining forces to present two lovely Snow White retellings!

The Witch of Belle Isle

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A war between brothers. An apple between friends.

Trapped in the prison camp on Belle Isle, Henry longs for freedom–and instead finds a girl named Faith. How far would you go to save your enemy? And how far would you go to save your friend?

This short story is a Snow White inspired historical fantasy.

Purchase here.

About Annie:

Annie Louise Twitchell is a homeschool graduate who is obsessed with dragons and fairy tales. She enjoys reading, writing, poetry, and many forms of art. When she’s not writing, she can often be found reading out loud to her cat, rabbit, and houseplants, or wandering barefoot in the area around her Western Maine home.

Contact Annie:
AnnieLouiseTwitchell.com
Annie-louise-twitchell.blogspot.com
Facebook.com/AnnieLouiseTwitchell
Instagram: @annietwitchell
Twitter: @WriterAnnieLou

 

Death’s Mirror

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“How do your human stories begin? Ah, yes. Once upon a time…”

Death tells the story of Snow White.

Purchase here.

About Rebekah:

Rebekah DeVall prides herself on being the girl who wrote 200,000 words in 21 days. She’s a Christian author with a penchant for killing characters and a love for writing real female protagonists described as “the example of a Christian hero that young readers need to see”.

Contact Rebekah:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Rebekah-DeVall-Author-217931808704713/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rebekahdevall/
Blog: http://www.rebekahdevall.wordpress.com